Question for those with DA dogs

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PittiMama03031
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Question for those with DA dogs

Postby PittiMama03031 » Mon Mar 16, 2009 6:17 pm

Hi, I am still trying to figure out if Moose is DA. I am trying to get an appointment with a behavorist right now to have him evaluated. There has only been one dog who Moose has straight out gone after. If you would like to be to explain in detail let me know. What I would like to know, is what do your dogs do when confronted by another dog, step by step if you please. What do they do first, growl, freeze, whine? What do they do next, and so on. This is strictly for info, as I said I am seeking professional help to make a final decision on whether he is showing signs of DA. Thank you to any that want to help.

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Postby Maryellen » Mon Mar 16, 2009 6:45 pm

every dog is different, some make noises, some dont, some freeze , some dont, some whine some wont. some dogs will even act friendly to get the other dog close enough to grab.. each dog is different..

my other pitbull makes a scene if another dog barks or acts up, and is not as quiet as my mix.

if your dog is a pit bull then DA runs in its genetics, you cant fix it, only manage it.. my pit mix is selective DA, he will be very quiet depending on the dog, stare, get very tense, or he might play bow to get the dog closer and then will hit.. the best thing you can do is just teach him to behave in public and not let any strange dogs near him.. a behaviorist cant fix DA, only help you manage it.

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Postby patty » Mon Mar 16, 2009 9:18 pm

I agree with everything Maryellen said. The behavorist should give you guidelines for a dog that is DA, but it is up to you to apply them at all times.

We have one female who likes to bark and definitely alerts to other dogs. She has not exhibited any DA tendencies

Our male is silent and is extremely DA towards other male dogs.

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Postby WackyJacki » Tue Mar 17, 2009 11:30 am

As stated above, it varies from dog to dog.

My girl has been DA since we got her at 12 weeks old! We think it stems more from fear then anything, but is of course fueled by genetics too.

She makes a big scene around other dogs and goes right for them. Barking, lunging, hackles raised, etc.

Our behaviorist thinks she is trying to scare them off rather then fight, but will most definitely go for it if they within striking distance (as we sadly found out once, but thankfully the dog only had one puncture wound and was otherwise ok).

I'm actually grateful that she makes a scene rather then being quiet and "luring" the dog in. At least I know exactly what her intentions are lol

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Postby BabyReba » Tue Mar 17, 2009 1:08 pm

My one dog is not overtly dog aggressive, but he's also not really what I consider dog friendly with strange dogs.

When he sees a dog, he gets stressed and whines a bit and just seems a little excited. If the other dog approaches, he may be totally fine with the dog and will bring his attention back to me when I request it. Or, he may be totally not fine and one second he seems normal, the next he's grabbing hold. It's in my best interests, and his, to just not worry about actually socializing with other dogs . . . He's in control in my house around the dogs we have, and that's good enough for me.

Obviously, he has what it takes to injure another dog, and he's shown me that in some circumstances he may feel the need to go there . . . so from that point forward, it was just safer to not worry one way or the other about having him meet new dogs or how dog friendly he may or may not be . . . we just focus on good training and good control, whether there are other dogs in the area or not. He can be around other in-control, on-leash dogs now with no problem . . . really, he doesn't even seem to notice them much unless they are carrying on and causing a scene.

Not sure if that's helpful or not, but that's been my experience with this particular dog.

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PittiMama03031
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Thanks to all

Postby PittiMama03031 » Tue Mar 17, 2009 1:47 pm

I am not counting on fixing the problem if Moose is DA, just learning how better to protect all concerned. The problem is that all of the dogs in my neighbor hood are free to roam at will, some people even let their dog out of the house when they see Moose. Which is a nightmare, because one house in particular has small dogs that run right up to him barking their heads off and growling at him. So i am just trying to make sure he if he is DA, before I make the decision to keep him muzzled when I walk him. I already avoid that house, but I never know when a random dog is going to be loose. Thanks for the help. For those who have read my posts before, I had planned on taking him to be tested before, but then he seemed to be fine with other dogs. I am thinking about adding another puppy next year though, and I jsut want to do everything I can to make sure it is the best things for Moose, before I add another dog.

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Postby WackyJacki » Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:38 pm

I too have neighbors who let their dogs off leash. Thankfully, she's never gotten a hold of one... they seem to know to stay the hell away lol.

And btw, if your leashed dog bites an unleashed dog, this is not your fault. Would you feel horrible and would it totally suck? Yes, but the person at fault would be the owner of the unleashed dog, not yours.

Maybe you could talk to these people or write them a letter (in a very friendly manner, of course) letting them know that your dog isn't always friendly and is greatly stressed out by off leash dogs running towards him and that he might feel the need to protect himself if he is approached, so it might be best for all involved for them to keep their dog leashed.

If this doesn't help... and worse comes to worse... call the police. There are leash laws (and for good reason!)

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Postby WackyJacki » Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:39 pm

I too have neighbors who let their dogs off leash. Thankfully, she's never gotten a hold of one... they seem to know to stay the hell away lol.

And btw, if your leashed dog bites an unleashed dog, this is not your fault. Would you feel horrible and would it totally suck? Yes, but the person at fault would be the owner of the unleashed dog, not yours.

Maybe you could talk to these people or write them a letter (in a very friendly manner, of course) letting them know that your dog isn't always friendly and is greatly stressed out by off leash dogs running towards him and that he might feel the need to protect himself if he is approached, so it might be best for all involved for them to keep their dog leashed.

If this doesn't help... and worse comes to worse... call the police. There are leash laws (and for good reason!)

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Postby WackyJacki » Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:39 pm

I too have neighbors who let their dogs off leash. Thankfully, she's never gotten a hold of one... they seem to know to stay the hell away lol.

And btw, if your leashed dog bites an unleashed dog, this is not your fault. Would you feel horrible and would it totally suck? Yes, but the person at fault would be the owner of the unleashed dog, not yours.

Maybe you could talk to these people or write them a letter (in a very friendly manner, of course) letting them know that your dog isn't always friendly and is greatly stressed out by off leash dogs running towards him and that he might feel the need to protect himself if he is approached, so it might be best for all involved for them to keep their dog leashed.

If this doesn't help... and worse comes to worse... call the police. There are leash laws (and for good reason!)

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Postby WackyJacki » Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:40 pm

:oops: :oops: :oops:

Oh crap.... sorry for the triple post lol

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Re: Thanks to all

Postby BabyReba » Tue Mar 17, 2009 3:09 pm

PittiMama03031 wrote:I am not counting on fixing the problem if Moose is DA, just learning how better to protect all concerned. The problem is that all of the dogs in my neighbor hood are free to roam at will, some people even let their dog out of the house when they see Moose. Which is a nightmare, because one house in particular has small dogs that run right up to him barking their heads off and growling at him. So i am just trying to make sure he if he is DA, before I make the decision to keep him muzzled when I walk him. I already avoid that house, but I never know when a random dog is going to be loose. Thanks for the help. For those who have read my posts before, I had planned on taking him to be tested before, but then he seemed to be fine with other dogs. I am thinking about adding another puppy next year though, and I jsut want to do everything I can to make sure it is the best things for Moose, before I add another dog.


To protect all concerned, I would ask your neighbors who let the dog out when they see you not to do so, and I'd probably try to contact any other neighbors with free roaming dogs and ask them to be more considerate and leash their dogs when they are off their property.

It seems to me that if small barking dogs and other dogs off leash are running up on your dog in public on a regular basis, and your dog isn't reacting in an aggressive way, then that should be the answer to your question for the most part. If he can tolerate that kind of thing, it sounds like he must be pretty even-keeled. He may not love every dog he meets, but he's obviously got a lot of tolerance!

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Postby Maryellen » Tue Mar 17, 2009 4:06 pm

you can also carry Direct Stop, Mace (if allowed in your state) or to keep the stray dogs away kick them away.. then walk the other way. any time you see a loose dog call ACO as well, so that there is a record of the loose dog every time its loose so the owner can be fined. i have no problem kicking a dog coming toward me or my dog to keep my dog from being killed by AC

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Postby WackyJacki » Wed Mar 18, 2009 10:09 am

Maryellen wrote:you can also carry Direct Stop, Mace (if allowed in your state) or to keep the stray dogs away kick them away.. then walk the other way. any time you see a loose dog call ACO as well, so that there is a record of the loose dog every time its loose so the owner can be fined. i have no problem kicking a dog coming toward me or my dog to keep my dog from being killed by AC


Amen to that.

Thankfully I haven't had to, but I would.

We have to protect our dogs, ourselves, and those around us.

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Postby UnconventionalLove » Wed Mar 18, 2009 2:16 pm

WackyJacki wrote:And btw, if your leashed dog bites an unleashed dog, this is not your fault. Would you feel horrible and would it totally suck? Yes, but the person at fault would be the owner of the unleashed dog, not yours.


Although very true, if something were to happen it could be one of those incidents where people think "Oh my god, my poor little dog! That vicious pit bull attacked it! What if it had been a kid?" So it's better to use a muzzle and/or talk to the idiots who let their dog roam free off their property. I am sure you are well aware of this, but just wanna point that out. :)

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Postby WackyJacki » Wed Mar 18, 2009 2:22 pm

UnconventionalLove wrote:
WackyJacki wrote:And btw, if your leashed dog bites an unleashed dog, this is not your fault. Would you feel horrible and would it totally suck? Yes, but the person at fault would be the owner of the unleashed dog, not yours.


Although very true, if something were to happen it could be one of those incidents where people think "Oh my god, my poor little dog! That vicious pit bull attacked it! What if it had been a kid?" So it's better to use a muzzle and/or talk to the idiots who let their dog roam free off their property. I am sure you are well aware of this, but just wanna point that out. :)


Well of course the pit would be blamed! Naturally... ugh....

I'm talking legally though...

People are so annoying :po:


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