Resource guarding

Tricks, obedience, behavior, and more.
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ewwies
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Re: Resource guarding

Postby ewwies » Tue Aug 30, 2011 9:35 pm

It looks as if she is playing?

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patty
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Re: Resource guarding

Postby patty » Tue Aug 30, 2011 11:18 pm

Looks like a fun game of "keep away". Our male will do this on occasion when he feels frisky. Like the person in this video I don't push or actually try and take away the toy/bone. We just enjoy burning off some energy.

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Re: Resource guarding

Postby AllisonPitbullLvr » Wed Aug 31, 2011 7:52 pm

One of my coworkers has an 8 week old golden retreiver puppy that she believes is already showing signs of resource guarding.

This puppy was hand raised by her for a few weeks very early on and then placed back with the litter once strong enough.

Is it possible that the puppy is just "testing" his world? He growls and bites at her hands when she tries to remove stuff (grass, toys) from him.

Any resources that I can direct her to? Websites? Videos?

She will be enrolling him in a puppy class as soon as he has his second set of vaccines (2 weeks or so)

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Red
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Re: Resource guarding

Postby Red » Thu Sep 01, 2011 12:23 am

patty wrote: Like the person in this video I don't push or actually try and take away the toy/bone.


The person in the video, my husband, did take the bone away as the dog was chewing on it, for video purpose. The dog is my foster Zoey and taking the bone was safe. The body language and vocalization that one needs not to overlook is another, and it does not always involve big displays. The subtle signs is what people miss, wasting the opportunity to start working with the dog before behaviors escalate.

I "used" her because some people would look at that as an unsafe behavior. I did an assessment on a pit bull female 3 months ago, that was "growling viciously over food and toys", and the owner was thinking to euthanize her. The dog was (still is) a nice animal and this would have almost be funny if the dog wasn't about to loose her life because her owner watched a TV show, and determined that the dog was becoming dangerous. Her owner thought that moving away with a possession was a certain sign of dominance and combined with the "growling"....dangerous dog.



I'll post a video of a different dog tomorrow, with the same food source, if I can get to it.But for now I'll add another. What do you think is happening with this Rottweiller? Would that be an appropriate way (environmentally as well) to work around a dog with resource guarding issues? Do you see a difference between Zoey's body language, when the bone was taken, and this dog?



Rednosemurph , I'll send you a PM with contact info shortly.

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Re: Resource guarding

Postby ProudMommy77 » Thu Sep 01, 2011 5:01 am

Val in the video of the Rottie, correct me, if I am wrong (which I am sure I may be.) the dog looked to be stressing, the ears were going back, it was hyper aware of of the presence of the owner, and started to chew more vigaroulsy on the bone, it seemed to stiffen slightly when touched. I heard a growl, and seen the dog place it's mouth on her hand. I am also uncomfortable with the way she started playing keep away from the bone, to me that could create more position over the said item, yes? And having other dogs present, one in particular that was interested in the bone, and climbing over the dog, to me that screams accident waiting to happen. My random thoughts.

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Re: Resource guarding

Postby BrokenAquarian » Thu Sep 01, 2011 1:36 pm

The rottie video made me feel very uncomfortable. The whole time, the dog was worrying over the bone and trying to keep her away from it. She even moved away from her with the bone. It was more like the girl was trying to trick the dog and steal the bone.

The multiple dogs and the method of removal was not setting up for a good outcome, nor a good learning experience for the rottie.

I still think the best way is to teach a release word. It reduces/removes the stress from taking the object away unexpectedly.

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Re: Resource guarding

Postby MissKitty » Fri Sep 02, 2011 12:54 am

BrokenAquarian wrote:The rottie video made me feel very uncomfortable. The whole time, the dog was worrying over the bone and trying to keep her away from it. She even moved away from her with the bone. It was more like the girl was trying to trick the dog and steal the bone.

The multiple dogs and the method of removal was not setting up for a good outcome, nor a good learning experience for the rottie.

I still think the best way is to teach a release word. It reduces/removes the stress from taking the object away unexpectedly.


I agree with this. The woman is very lucky that dog is so tolerant, s/he was obviously stressed out and not at all enjoying the 'love' she is bestowing on him.

And she is putting a lot of pressure on the dog, petting, sitting in close proximity, etc and the dog is very uncomfortable with it. I think if you were to use this 'method', you need to add a small amount of pressure (an amount where the dog is slightly worried about your presence but not stressed to a point where they can't come back down) and maintain that pressure until the dog relaxes and then immediately release that pressure (leave).
Not something I would do with a dog, but I think it would be better than what she did in the video.

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Re: Resource guarding

Postby Red » Fri Sep 02, 2011 12:56 am

ProudMommy77 wrote: the dog looked to be stressing, the ears were going back, it was hyper aware of of the presence of the owner, and started to chew more vigaroulsy on the bone, it seemed to stiffen slightly when touched. I heard a growl, and seen the dog place it's mouth on her hand. I am also uncomfortable with the way she started playing keep away from the bone, to me that could create more position over the said item, yes? And having other dogs present, one in particular that was interested in the bone, and climbing over the dog, to me that screams accident waiting to happen. My random thoughts.


Yes, you picked up on quite a few things. The environment was inappropriate and so was the overall approach. When working with resource guarding once should approach the dog in a circle, from the front area, so the dog can see exactly where the person is and is not startled by a touch on the back or rear end area that comes from behind.The dog knew she was there, yes, but also followed the movement of her hands a few times and was concerned about her sitting down from the beginning. Zoey was soliciting my husband to chase her in a game of keep away, but when he actually touched her and then reached for the bone she did not feel the need to look at what he was doing. She did not frantically accelerated the chewing or punched the bone, just continued what she was doing. The tail movement was faster, but the tail set and everything else was simply a positive response to being touched.

Leaning by the dog's front end, moving into the bone space was not wise. The wrong eye contact and movement with the face so close to a dog's possession is a potential problem. The breathing pattern...none of the other dogs was panting, why? It is possible that maybe the Rottie was just outside running around, but changes in the breathing pattern need to be kept in mind.If a room temperature is fine, and the dog has not moved around enough to raise the body temperature there should not be obvious changes just for chewing on a bone.
The freeze at 3.33, oblique eye stare and growling with mouth on the bone...the dog is sending a clear message and continuing to pet the dog on the face when the animal is still over the bone is not smart. Those are "healthy" warnings and they need to be respected. There should have not been a vocal warning, if the session was carried out correctly.

I am also uncomfortable with the way she started playing keep away from the bone, to me that could create more position over the said item, yes?


Yes. It makes no sense to encourage the dog to get the bone and keeping it away, adding even more value to the item. No point in getting the dog worked up over the same item one is working with. Kissing the dog on the mouth when the animal was holding the bone...ugh. I am sure that the person in the video thought that was so cool and proof that things worked, but at the end the dog did warn when she placed her hand on the bone, so what was really the outcome of that "session"? The other dogs in the environment, one even walking over the Rottie with the bone under the dog is not a good choice. I don't know the dog, of course, so I can only make observation based on those minutes in the video. Overall I think that it would fairly easy to work with the animal with better protocols.

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Re: Resource guarding

Postby sindorei » Fri Sep 02, 2011 11:25 pm

Red wrote:Thought to make this more interactive with videos, so that people can see body language, hear vocalization, and discuss what they think they are seeing.
Is this dog resource guarding? She is growling and moving away as the person approaches her when she has a fresh bone.



Looks like good natured resource guarding. "hey this is mine hehehehe you cant have it its miiiiiine hey bug off so i can chew it you silly human its mine". its still resource guarding, but theres no malice. the dog has a very patient personality and just wants to lay down chew her goodies. she wants it all for herself but isnt going to pick a fight over it

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Re: Resource guarding

Postby elementbrds » Thu Dec 01, 2011 6:44 pm

Had my first experience with this today. I took Lucy on a hike with another pit from her litter (my buddy is the owner), and we set down a water bowl for the pups to take a break and drink. Lucy was panting and super thirsty so she went nuts immediately once she saw that a tastey beverage was in her future... as soon as the bowl is filled she starts gulping it down and hogging it, then i pulled her away so her pal could drink too, and when i pulled her back she went nuts on the other pup and got very aggresive and biting at him and possiby me also but i'm not sure on that because she didnt land any teeth on me and it may just have been that i got between the 2 dogs. I rolled her onto her back and held her there for a second and she of course looked at me with a huge smile on her face as though nothing had happened at all and she was trying to jump and kiss me already.

I'm assuming it was a mistake to have only put down 1 bowl to begin with, but i still dont want her being aggressive. Thoughts on what i could have done better? Thanks ahead of time

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Re: Resource guarding

Postby mtlu » Thu Dec 01, 2011 11:08 pm

elementbrds wrote:I rolled her onto her back and held her there for a second and she of course looked at me with a huge smile on her face as though nothing had happened at all and she was trying to jump and kiss me already.

No need to roll her on her back and hold her :) There's lots of good information in this thread about how to work with resource guarding.

I would focus less on her "being aggressive" but start watching for situations that might trigger a reaction, such as you experienced with the one water dish. Food, toys, water dishes, all kinds of things can trigger resource guarding to various degrees. A dog may be able to play with a rope toy with another dog but get possessive if a ball is brought out for both dogs to fetch – it really depends on each dog, their tolerances and how they value the object. A friend of ours owns a Boston Terrier who snarked at my dog in their kitchen because she walked by his *empty* water dish. Since we don't see them all the time and I cannot work with their dog, we just manage very carefully when we visit and only one dog is in the kitchen at any time and all the dogs are fed and given water in separate areas.

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Re: Resource guarding

Postby ethanh8791 » Sun Mar 04, 2012 2:11 am

Not sure what to do - my dog has had issues with resource guarding for some years, he's 7 now, and I've always just managed it. Recently my dog has growled at other people that he is not familiar with (example scenario: roommates friend comes over - interacts with all of us in same room, friend displays some sort of interaction with myself or roommate and he starts getting tense, growls, etc..). Today he growled at my roommate when I opened the door to my room....something which has never happened before. Help! :crybaby:

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Re: Resource guarding

Postby gerry » Sun Jul 08, 2012 3:39 pm

Red, I feel you have given people a really good starting point for approaching this issue. A few comments here, not to disagree, but only to add, as you asked for more information.

Your "incremental graded exposure" is presented only with object value. With some dogs, adding distance as a factor may also help. With one dog I wrote about recently here, he would lunge and guard any object of interest, even those of relatively low value. In that case, distance and a mildly aversive interrupter was used to create the incremental graded exposure, while also introducing an alternate behavior. Before I get flamed for it, I started with a squirt bottle (a few squirts, then simply showing the bottle) then progressed to a "stop hand" which is often effective as it provides a visual break from the object.

And, of course, there are other variations that neither of us have touched upon, but your basic approach still applies.

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Re: Resource guarding

Postby MarMar » Sun Jul 29, 2012 12:24 am

I just can't understand why someone would treat resource guarding with aversives (that can link to negative associations with the human involved) when it is so workable without?

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Re: Resource guarding

Postby Celesteandthebullies » Sun Jul 29, 2012 1:43 am

MarMar wrote:I just can't understand why someone would treat resource guarding with aversives (that can link to negative associations with the human involved) when it is so workable without?

My thoughts as well. Plus the warnings being addressed however the emotional state still there, so possible "time bomb" as they say.


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