A Variety of Leash Training Methods

Tricks, obedience, behavior, and more.
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Rangersmom
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Re: re

Postby Rangersmom » Mon Jan 25, 2010 1:09 pm

This really is the best advice anyone could give, and Diane Jessup should know. Some dogs do require a prong collar, but it sounds like this one would be best off w/o it.

Lua wrote:
Diane Jessup wrote:No. Dangling food is considered "luring", and not something you want to do in positive training.

TO be honest, explaining the beginings/basics of teaching the heel are explained in detail many places, on the web, in Fully Bully Magazine, and in any good obedience magazine (like Front and Finish.) I will explain in VERY basic terms here, but please understand that this is a very ROUGH sketch.

Remember, you are training the dog with your brain, not your strong arm. So, you gotta think. First thing you think: how do I set it up so my dog won't be distracted? Won't wander off? Will WANT to do the correct behavior so I can reward it?
OK. Because, remember, this is not about SETTING UP YOUR DOG TO FAIL, such as turning suddenly without warning so the dog HAS to fail and yelp and get punished for doing what??? For not understanding. Punishment training sets the dog up to fail so you can correct - positive shows the dog what you want, and then you condition the dog that doing right is more rewarding than doing wrong!

So, you've figured out the first part. You take the dog somewhere quiet and safe, a backyard, a tennis court, etc. You will have had to do your homework and understand what motivates your dog. Not just show up with a few crummy hot dog pieces and think that will cut it. To get the deal on motivation, see Issue I/II/III/IV of Fully Bully Magazine. I have explained it in detail there. Part of it is also on www.workingpitbull.com under training.

Now, if you have done YOUR PART as the teacher, you KNOW what motivates your dog and you have it with you. If it is food, call the dog to you, give it several pieces while the dog looks at you. Let the dog know you have the food. Again, if you have been lazy and your dog is so-so about food, you are not ready to train. If the dog is toy-happy, play with the toy for a few moments, so she knows you have it.

While the dog is interested in you, start walking. Dont call dog, don't look back. Just walk. If the dog wanders off, fine, let it. This is where patience comes in! The dog has no idea what is wanted right now. That's OK! Relax! :))

WHEN the dog happens to cross your path, or get into position, you "mark" the behavior with a marker (some people click, some like myself say "YES!") and then you either feed or throw the toy. (Food is better here because it is less distracting, but a toy works.) You can see where you have to have done your homework and understand what motivates your dog, or otherwise the dog will just loose interest in you. THat is YOUR PROBLEM, not he dogs!!!! BAD teacher - not bad dog!

So everytime the dog comes into the heel position you mark the behavior and then reinforce with the food. The food comes AFTER the "mark". The dog will, if this is done right, come to understand the mark is what is important. In fact, their eyes will dilate when they hear the word!

So you do this several times, in a place where dog can't wander off. In this place, you add distractions. I have described elsewhere how you can QUICKLY get your dog to ignore someone blatantly offering the dog food or a toy. This can be done in one session. Its simply a matter of teaching the dog that by running off, they don't get the satisfaction of the distraction and they are "burning daylight" with you and your rewards. If you ever get a chance to see a good trainer do this, it is really trick! :headbang:

Obviously you take small steps so that the dog learns WHAT IS RIGHT - not WHAT IS WRONG! You add all kinds of small distractions, work the dog through them, and then add bigger ones. Then put the leash on and go forth into the world. But hey, remember, you are USING YOUR BRAIN so don't dump huge distractions on the dog all at once. If your dog has a dog aggression problem, fine, work on it in the beginning, not once you sally forth. Common sense.

Anywho, my fingers are sore!!! :thumbsup: If you have trouble finding good info on positive training let me know. I can help you. There are links on my site.


Excellent post!

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Maximus
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Re: A Variety of Leash Training Methods

Postby Maximus » Tue Mar 20, 2012 6:28 pm

Ok my puppy is almost 12 weeks. He heels when im walking him alone, but when someone else joins he starts to "ADD" around.

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starrlamia
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Re: A Variety of Leash Training Methods

Postby starrlamia » Tue Mar 20, 2012 7:13 pm

I wouldn't expect a twelve week old pup to be 100% on anything.

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Maximus
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Re: A Variety of Leash Training Methods

Postby Maximus » Tue Mar 20, 2012 7:15 pm

ok cool! When should he start being more on point you think?

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Stormi
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A Variety of Leash Training Methods

Postby Stormi » Tue Mar 20, 2012 7:22 pm

Maximus wrote:ok cool! When should he start being more on point you think?


Working daily on leash manners, rewarding for position and building upon impulse control, can take up to a full year to have a dog that is reliable in every situation. Its a foreign and complex task we are asking of them. A 12 week old pup is just at the beginning of his learning, so keep it fun, rewarding, and set him up for success :)

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Maximus
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Re: A Variety of Leash Training Methods

Postby Maximus » Tue Mar 20, 2012 9:48 pm

Stormi wrote:
Maximus wrote:ok cool! When should he start being more on point you think?


Working daily on leash manners, rewarding for position and building upon impulse control, can take up to a full year to have a dog that is reliable in every situation. Its a foreign and complex task we are asking of them. A 12 week old pup is just at the beginning of his learning, so keep it fun, rewarding, and set him up for success :)

Thank you so much for the info!

Amazing news! I bought a clicker today and started to use it with Max. After a few hours of using it( and a few new tricks) I took him out on a walk. Used the clicker to make him heel, worked amazingly! It was my girlfriend, my mom, and I. Max did unbelievable. I used the info from this post, plus a clicker every time he went into heel by himself. He had never walked this well before, especially when other people are walking with us.

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Stormi
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A Variety of Leash Training Methods

Postby Stormi » Tue Mar 20, 2012 10:57 pm

Maximus wrote:
Amazing news! I bought a clicker today and started to use it with Max. After a few hours of using it( and a few new tricks) I took him out on a walk. Used the clicker to make him heel, worked amazingly! It was my girlfriend, my mom, and I. Max did unbelievable. I used the info from this post, plus a clicker every time he went into heel by himself. He had never walked this well before, especially when other people are walking with us.


That's fantastic! Great job! Clicker training really is such a fun and wonderful way to train, isn't it? :)


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