Gering, NE

Discuss Breed Specific Legislation and local county laws on pit bull ownership.
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heather
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Gering, NE

Postby heather » Sat Oct 27, 2012 8:08 pm

Gering, Nebraska looking at an ordinance targeting pit bulls and rottweilers.

http://blessthebullys.wordpress.com/201 ... s-rotties/

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Re: Gering, NE

Postby heather » Thu Nov 08, 2012 7:55 pm

crosspost from blessthebullys:

I spoke with the Gering city clerk today, and she advised the agenda for next Monday's meeting will be posted by Friday afternoon, so we'll know at that time if the ordinance will be discussed at the next meeting. In the meantime, please continue to send your polite, respectful and informative opposition to BSL to the Gering officials.

http://blessthebullys.wordpress.com/201 ... s-rotties/



Gering City Council to research dangerous and vicious dog ordinance

Posted: Oct 23, 2012

In light of a recent pit bull attack the Gering City Council has some decisions to make.



Georgetta Weimer of Gering was washing her car when her neighbor's two pitbulls came into her yard.



One of the pitbulls chased her into her garage.



The police arrived on the scene to help contain the pit bull and to address a verbal confrontation between the Weimers and their neighbor.



The Weimers appeared at the gering city council meeting to discuss new ordinances for vicious and dangerous dogs.



Gering City Council member Monette Ross says the incident scared the couple.



"That it was very, very frightening and they're concerned for themselves, also for little kids that'll be running around through the neighborhood etc. And they wanted city council to do something to protect them."



Ross says the City Council will turn the case over to the city's attorney to research other cities dog ordinances.


http://www.kotanow.com/story/19895472/g ... gerous-and

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heather
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Re: Gering, NE

Postby heather » Mon Nov 19, 2012 9:55 am

For citizens interested in the discussions in Gering, the city council has appointed a special ad hoc committee to consider dog ordinance issues. The committee will meet Monday at 4:30 p.m. at Gering’s City Hall.


The original alert for Gering, Nebraska can be found here:
http://blessthebullys.wordpress.com/201 ... s-rotties/




OPINION: Dog control





When Gene and Georgetta Weimer’s dog suffered after being attacked by a neighbor’s pit bull, they expected some action. Their neighbor, Eric Franke, was fined $100 for allowing his dog to run at large, although their dog required hundreds in dollars of veterinary care.

As responsible citizens, the Weimers took their case to the Gering City Council. They described the horrific attack that their dog suffered, the chaotic scene that preceded it and the two surgeries that their dog underwent. They even provided pictures of the dog’s injuries.
“When an aggressive, dangerous animal is allowed to roam a neighborhood, who’s owner takes no responsibility for his or his animals actions, a neighborhood turns into something dark, mistrusting and unsafe,” Georgetta Weimer wrote in a letter to the Star-Herald.

The case started a lively discussion of what is called “breed specific legislation” — opponents’ term for a ban on pit bulls. Many letters to the editor followed, and virtually all opposed breed specific legislation. Writers noted that all breeds of dogs are involved in dog bite cases, which we found to be true in gathering numbers from Scottsbluff and Gering police departments. Over a nearly two-year period, pit bulls were responsible for only four out of 26 dog bite cases reported to the Gering Police Department. In Scottsbluff, pitbulls were cited in three out of 47 cases over the same period.

The numbers show that a variety of dogs are involved in dog bite cases. In fact, terriers are involved in most dog bite cases reported to the Gering Police Department. Boxers are the chief offenders in Scottsbluff, with four incidents involving dog bites.

Pit bull fans argue that criminal and civil laws are more effective than breed bans. It’s similar to the argument against gun laws: Why punish all owners if only some people act irresponsibly?

Unfortunately, some of the criminal laws don’t have a lot of teeth. In Gering, a dog owner faces a fine of $25 to $100 for allowing a dog to run at large. In Scottsbluff, a dog owner can face a fine up to $250 for allowing a dog to run at large. Scottsbluff also assesses owners a fee for transportation and other costs if dogs have to be impounded at the Panhandle Humane Society.

If the criminal penalties aren’t enough to compel people to control dangerous dogs — and for some owners, apparently, they aren’t — a dog bite victim can seek civil remedies. Local attorney Andrew Snyder has represented many clients in lawsuits involving dog bites and has won awards exceeding $100,000 in cases where children have suffered serious injuries from dog bites.

Because children are smaller, he said, they suffer dog bites to the face more often than adults. In some cases, he said, those injuries are severe enough to warrant repeated plastic surgery immediately afterward and as the child grows. Juries take dog bite injuries seriously, he said. A database with the Trial Lawyers Association indicates that most awards in such cases range from $50,000 to $100,000, depending on the child, the severity of the injury and other factors.

While some pit bulls may be harmless pets, they are the leading breed involved in fatal dog attacks, based on statistics from the Centers for Disease Control. Some owners admire them for their ferocity, encourage it, and train their dogs to be fighters. Those dogs are like a loaded gun. When something goes terribly wrong, their owners ought to face serious consequences.

If you own a dog, you’re responsible for its actions. Whether he gets into the neighbor’s chicken coop or bites a child, you are civilly liable for the damages that he causes, Snyder said.

“That’s what dogs do” is no excuse. Judges shouldn’t settle for “It was an accident.” Fines should discourage irresponsibility.

We’ve heard dog owners and trainers argue that dogs are like children. That’s right. They need to be cared for and supervised. But they also need to be restrained and controlled. They should be kenneled or kept on a leash.
It’s best for you. It’s best for the public. It’s best for your dog.

For citizens interested in the discussions in Gering, the city council has appointed a special ad hoc committee to consider dog ordinance issues. The committee will meet Monday at 4:30 p.m. at Gering’s City Hall.

http://www.starherald.com/opinion/opini ... 963f4.html

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Re: Gering, NE

Postby heather » Tue Nov 20, 2012 8:49 am

An ad hoc committee designated to research a new animal control ordinance in Gering, NE decided against breed specific measures at last night's meeting.

http://blessthebullys.wordpress.com/201 ... no-to-bsl/


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